Latest News

We collect latest biology news in the world. The news is refreshed every hour.

  • Noises from human activity may threaten New England's freshwater soundscape
    on March 18, 2020 at 7:41 pm

    Sounds produced by human activities—anthropogenic sounds—account for more than 90 percent of the underwater soundscape in major freshwater habitats of New England. Rodney Rountree of The Fish Listener in Massachusetts, and Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Victoria, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on March 18, 2020.

  • Reef manta rays in New Caledonia dive up to 672 meters deep at night
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    The first data collected on the diving behavior of reef manta rays in New Caledonia considerably extend the known depth range for this vulnerable species in decline, according to a new study.

  • Heatwaves risky for fish
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    A world-first study using sophisticated genetic analysis techniques have found that some fish are better than others at coping with heatwaves. The study tracks wild fish populations during a severe marine heatwave that killed a third of the Great Barrier Reef corals.

  • New species of sawsharks found in West Indian Ocean
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    Two new species of sawsharks discovered in the West Indian Ocean reinforces how much we still don't know about life in the ocean and the impact climate change is having on it.

  • Crop diversity can buffer the effects of climate change
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:37 pm

    Researchers found that farms with diverse crops planted together provide more secure, stable habitats for wildlife and are more resilient to climate change than the single-crop standard that dominates today's agriculture industry.

  • New technique 'prints' cells to create diverse biological environments
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    With the help of photolithography and programmable DNA, researchers have created a new technique that can rapidly 'print' two-dimensional arrays of cells and proteins that mimic a wide variety of cellular environments in the body. This technique could help scientists develop a better understanding of the complex cell-to-cell messaging that dictates a cell's final fate.

  • Supercomputers unlock reproductive mysteries of viruses and life
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    Supercomputer simulations support a new mechanism for the budding off of viruses like the coronavirus. ESCRTIII polymer features clear intrinsic twist in molecular dynamics simulations, might play major role in creating three-dimensional buckling of the cell membrane. Related study used simulations to find mechanism for DNA base addition during replication.

  • Hodor 'holds the door' open for a potential new way to curb mosquito populations
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    The identification of an insect-specific metal-sensing receptor in the gut lining highlights a possible new way to curb populations of disease-transmitting insects such as mosquitoes.

  • Maggot analysis goes molecular for forensic cases
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:36 pm

    Maggots on a dead body or wound can help pinpoint when a person or animal died, or when maltreatment began in elder, child care or animal neglect cases. However, the current process for making this determination is time consuming and resource intensive. It also relies on species assessment by trained entomologists. Now, researchers report the development of a molecular maggot analysis method that's quick, easy and less subjective.

  • New technique has potential to protect oranges from citrus greening
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:14 pm

    Citrus greening, also called Huanglongbing (HLB), is devastating the citrus industry. Florida alone has experienced a 50 to 75 percent reduction in citrus production. There are no resistant varieties of citrus available and limited disease control measures.

  • Brand new shark(s), doo doo, doo doo doo doo
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    Not one, but TWO new species of the rarely seen six-gilled sawsharks have been found in the West Indian Ocean by an international team of marine scientists.

  • Microplastics found in a quarter of San Diego estuary fish
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    In a sampling of fish from a creek that flows into San Diego Bay, nearly a quarter contain microplastics, according to a new study published in the journal PLOS ONE. The study, which examined plastics in coastal sediments and three species of fish, showed that the frequency and types of plastic ingested varied with fish species and, in some cases, size or age of fish.

  • Evolution selects for 'loners' that hang back from collective behavior—at least in slime molds
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    It isn't easy being a loner—someone who resists the pull of the crowd, who marches to their own drummer.

  • New technique 'prints' cells to create diverse biological environments
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    Like humans, cells can be easily influenced by peer pressure.

  • Bacteria cause problems for genetic research
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    A puzzling modification of DNA that is common in bacteria is not present in humans or other mammals. This has been shown in a new study by scientists at Linköping University in Sweden, published in Science Advances. The study shows that detection of the epigenetic mark 6mdA in animals was probably the result of limitations of the technology used and bacterial contamination of samples.

  • Reef manta rays in New Caledonia dive up to 672 meters deep at night
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    The first data collected on the diving behavior of reef manta rays in New Caledonia considerably extend the known depth range for this vulnerable species in decline, according to a study published March 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hugo Lassauce of the University of New Caledonia, and colleagues. These results add new information on the habitat use of the species in a region where manta behavior has not previously been studied, and increase their known depth range by more than 200 m.

  • Warming seas: Climate change's toll on tropical fish
    on March 18, 2020 at 6:00 pm

    In 2016, ocean temperatures soared, devastating the corals of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. As the frequency, duration and magnitude of these marine heatwaves increases due to human-induced climate change, scientists have yet to fully grasp the physiological, behavioral, and long-term consequences for wild fish populations.

  • How does an intersex bee behave?
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:15 pm

    In the neotropical forest of Barro Colorado Island in Panama, an unusual bee hatched: half male and half female. The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute students and scientists working on nocturnal, socially flexible Megalopta bees at BCI recognized it as a gynandromorph: a rare condition that results in the expression of both male and female characteristics.

  • How 'pioneer' protein turns stem cells into organs
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:14 pm

    Early on in each cell, a critical protein known as FoxA2 simultaneously binds to both the chromosomal proteins and the DNA, opening the flood gates for gene activation, according to a new study led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The discovery, published in Nature Genetics, helps untangle mysteries of how embryonic stem cells develop into organs.

  • Supercomputers unlock reproductive mysteries of viruses and life
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:14 pm

    Fundamental research supported by supercomputers could help lead to new strategies and better technology that combats infectious and genetic diseases.

  • Urban coyotes eat lots of cats—and human garbage, study of their poop reveals
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:12 pm

    A study that "dissected" 3,100 pieces of coyote poop discovered domestic cats are a big part of what urban coyotes eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner, according to the National Park Service.

  • Hodor 'holds the door' open for a potential new way to curb mosquito populations
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    The identification of an insect-specific metal-sensing receptor in the gut lining highlights a possible new way to curb populations of disease-transmitting insects such as mosquitoes.

  • Ancient fish fossil reveals evolutionary origin of the human hand
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    An ancient Elpistostege fish fossil found in Miguasha, Canada has revealed new insights into how the human hand evolved from fish fins.

  • New details revealed on how plants maintain optimal sperm-egg ratio
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    Current molecular biochemistry, microscopy and genetic techniques have become so powerful that scientists can now make mechanistic discoveries—supported by multiple lines of evidence—about intimate processes in plant reproduction that once were very difficult to examine, says molecular biologist Alice Cheung at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

  • Crop diversity can buffer the effects of climate change
    on March 18, 2020 at 4:00 pm

    How we farm can guard against climate change and protect critical wildlife—but only if we leave single-crop farms in the dust, according to a new Stanford study.

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Biologydictionary.net Editors. “Latest News.” Biology Dictionary, Biologydictionary.net, 11 Mar. 2020, https://biologydictionary.net/latest-news/.
Biologydictionary.net Editors. (2020, March 11). Latest News. Retrieved from https://biologydictionary.net/latest-news/
Biologydictionary.net Editors. “Latest News.” Biology Dictionary. Biologydictionary.net, March 11, 2020. https://biologydictionary.net/latest-news/.

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